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Canning Black Bean and Corn Salsa Recipe – The Safe Way

image of bowl of black bean and corn salsa with chips

My family loves salsa; we eat it on everything from eggs to tacos. My boys can polish off a quart of salsa and a couple of bags of tortilla chips in no time flat. Sometimes I like to serve a salsa that has a little extra nutrition, you know, to counter the bags of tortilla chips. That’s when I pull out our black bean and corn salsa recipe.

Normally I just make black bean and corn salsa as we want it but this summer I decided to can some with our garden tomatoes, onions and peppers. The texture is a not the same as making it fresh but it’s still very good and will be very convenient this winter.

You need a pressure canner to can any kind of beans or any kind of corn – in any quantities. If you don’t have a pressure canner click over to my fresh black bean and corn salsa recipe

I know other sites have black bean and corn salsa recipes that say it’s okay to just do a water bath, big sites that should know better, but you can’t. With the addition of both corn and beans it’s just not safe to can this salsa in the water bath canner. Also, a pressure canner is a wonderful tool and will save you time and money in the long run. 

Black bean and corn salsa can be made from mostly your garden ingredients and things you probably already have on hand. I’m a use what you have kind of cook, so if it has tomatoes, black beans, corn, onion, peppers, and lime, it’s black bean and corn salsa to me.

You can also use store bought ingredients and different quantities based on what your family likes.

image of jars of black bean and corn salsa after being removed from pressure canner

Making the Black Bean and Corn Salsa Recipe

The process to make black bean and corns salsa without buying canned beans, corn, or tomato products is a two day process. But it’s not like it takes all day each day. There’s just things you’ll want to do the day before you can the salsa, like freeze the tomatoes and soak the beans.

  • I like to freeze our tomatoes when we first pick them. When they thaw the skin comes right off. You can see my tomato canning process in action here. You can use fresh tomatoes but you’ll need to blanch them to remove the skins. Freezing the tomatoes is just easier.
  • Soak 1 pound of black beans overnight. The next day, drain the water and rinse. Put the beans in a pot of fresh water and bring to a boil. Turn down heat and simmer for 30 minutes.
  • While the beans are simmering, mix the following in a large bowl.
    • 8 cups corn
    • 1/2 cup lime juice
    • 1/3 cup olive oil
    • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
    • 4 tsp salt
    • 2 tsp black pepper
    • 5 lbs tomatoes – chopped
    • 9 jalapenos – chopped (optional)
    • 2 red onion – chopped (you can use white)
    • 1 cup cilantro – chopped
  • Drain the beans and add them to your salsa mixture.
  • Mix well.
image of canned black bean and corn salsa with Tattler reusable canning lids

How to Can Black Bean and Corn Salsa

  1. Put on a pot (or tea kettle) of water to boil. OR heat up the tomato water from the thawed tomatoes.
  2. Prepare canning jars by checking for cracks and washing in hot soapy water. You don’t need to sterilize jars when you use a pressure canner. But you can if you feel like it.
  3. Prepare lids by washing and drying  (Ball®no longer recommends placing lids in boiled water to prepare them) I like to use reusable caning lids when canning things for my family to cut the cost.
  4. Fill jars halfway with mixture. Do NOT pack the mixture down.
  5. Add boiling water (or tomato water) to the jars leaving a 1″ headspace.
  6. Put lids and and bands on the filled jars and process according the directions that came with your pressure canner for beans. For me it is for 1 hr and 15 minutes at 10 pounds of pressure for pints.

What if I don’t have a pressure canner?

If you don’t have a pressure canner but still want the convenience of ready made black bean and corn salsa you have a couple of different options.

One, you could use home canned tomato salsa and add properly canned black beans and canned  corn (pressure canned or store bought) when you serve it.

Two, you can make the black bean and corn salsa recipe but instead of simmering the black beans for only 30 minutes, cook them completely. Then put the salsa in wide mouth pint size jars and freeze them. If you are leery of freezing in glass containers I have some tips for you here.

Yield: approx. 12 pints

Canned Black Bean and Corn Salsa

Canned Black Bean and Corn Salsa

Canning black bean and corn salsa is a great way to preserve the summer harvest and makes a great side for parties and cooking out.

Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Additional Time 12 hours
Total Time 14 hours 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 pound dried black beans
  • 8 cups corn
  • 1/2 cup lime juice
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 4 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 5 lbs tomatoes – chopped
  • 9 jalapenos – chopped (optional)
  • 2 red onion – chopped (you can use white)
  • 1 cup cilantro – chopped

Instructions

    1. I like to freeze our tomatoes when we first pick them. When they thaw the skin comes right off. You can see my tomato canning process in action here. You can use fresh tomatoes but you'll need to blanch them to remove the skins. Freezing the tomatoes is just easier.
    2. Soak 1 pound of black beans overnight. The next day, drain the water and rinse. Put the beans in a pot of fresh water and bring to a boil. Turn down heat and simmer for 30 minutes.
    3. While the beans are simmering, mix all the above ingredients in a large bowl.
    4. After the beans have simmered for 30 minutes, drain the water and add to bowl of salsa ingredients.
    5. Put on a pot (or tea kettle) of water to boil. Or heat the tomato water from the thawed tomatoes (this is what I use)
    6. Prepare canning jars by checking for cracks and washing in hot soapy water. You don't need to sterilize jars when you use a pressure canner. But you can if you feel like it.
    7. Prepare lids by washing and drying  (Ball®no longer recommends placing lids in boiled water to prepare them)
    8. Put mixture in clean jars, filling each jar about halfway. Do NOT pack the mixture down.
    9. Add boiling water (or tomato water) to the jars leaving a 1" headspace.
    10. Put lids and and bands on the filled jars and process according the directions that came with your pressure canner for beans.  For me it is for 1 hr and 15 minutes at 10 pounds of pressure.


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    image of The Ultimate Guide to Preserving Vegetables and jars of home preserved vegetables

    The Ultimate Guide to Preserving Vegetables

    If you you’re looking for more preserving inspiration, I know you’ll love The Ultimate Guide to Preserving Vegetables. In this book I share how to can, dehydrate, freeze and ferment almost every vegetable. I also share 100 favorite recipes for preserving the vegetables in fun way that will save you time and money later. Get your copy here. Get your copy here.

    image of bowl of black bean and corn salsa

    What are you canning this summer? Feel free to leave links in the comments so we can all check them out.

    Thanks for sharing with your friends!

    Sheila hochberg

    Monday 6th of September 2021

    Can an insta pot be used for canning this recipe? If so, please advise me on how. Thank you!!!

    Angi Schneider

    Monday 13th of September 2021

    Hi Sheila, no an instant pot cannot be used for pressure canning. If you want to learn why, here's a video about it. There are links in the description to what the USDA and Instant Pot says about using an electric multi cooker as a canner.

    Amy

    Friday 3rd of September 2021

    So excited to try this! Do you need to use bottled lime juice in this recipe?

    Bonnie

    Thursday 2nd of September 2021

    I just found your recipe on Pinterest and want to try it. I bought a pressure canner last year but this is the first year I’ll be using it. In one of the comments below, you said pints need to be processed for 90 min. But in your recipe it said you processed for. 1 hour 15 min. Is that because you’re in a higher altitude? I’m at 5000 ft. I have checked the manual for my canner but it does not mention legumes. It said corn for 55 min (pints). On my canner it does have a setting for high altitudes, so that takes away the guess of pressure and weight. I checked the “Complete Guide do Hime Canning” website, but again, does not mention a time for legumes. I guess my question is… at 5000 ft, how long should I pressure can this recipe? Thank you and hope you get this 🤞🏼

    Angi Schneider

    Monday 13th of September 2021

    Hi Bonnie, pints need to be processed for 75 minutes and quarts need to be processed for 90 minutes. I looked for the comment you referred to but could not find it. When you pressure can, the time doesn't change based on altitude like it does when you water bath can. Instead the pressure changes. If you have a weighted gauge canner you'll need to process pint jars at 15psi for 75 minutes. If you are using a dial gauge pressure canner you'll need to process the jars at 13ps for 75 minutes. This recipe requires a stovetop pressure canner not an electric multi cooker that has a canning button.

    Amanda Van Sickle

    Wednesday 25th of August 2021

    Hello, In steps 8 and 9 the instructions tell us to fill the jars about 1/2 way with the salsa mixture and then add water leaving a 1 inch head space, but the description above the recipe instructs us to fill the jars with the salsa mixer leaving a 1 inch head space and then topping with boiling water. I was hoping that you could clarify which to follow as they seem like they would give drastically different results. Thanks!

    Jeannie A

    Thursday 2nd of September 2021

    @Angi Schneider, I so want to try this! It sounds wonderful! My question is, if you fill the jars 1/2 way with salsa then hot water to 1” headspace, how watery is this? Would you drain it when opening?

    Angi Schneider

    Friday 27th of August 2021

    So sorry!! Fill halfway with solids then hot water leaving a 1" headspace.

    Ronald Doty

    Friday 30th of July 2021

    I make a lot of salsas in the summertime here in NE. I use fresh sweet Vermont Corn, fresh tomatoes, fresh Jalapeños. But I never put black beans in my salsa because I was always told not to can beans of any kind. Finding your recipe was a god send. I love black bean and corn salsa. Now I have enough for the entire winter. I did add a little garlic and cumin in my salsa. But a wonderful recipe that I will keep forever. When is you book releasing? I want it. Thank you so much. New England Bakerman

    Angi Schneider

    Saturday 31st of July 2021

    Thank you so much! I'm so glad that the recipe was helpful to you. Pressure Canning for Beginners and Beyond will be released on August 24th. It's available for pre-ordering now from all major booksellers.

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